Questions to Ask During Your Virtual Home Tour

This is a great post from the Windermere Blog to help Buyers know how to interact with a virtual open house. 
Posted in Buying by Sandy Dodge

 

Annie Hyatt Real Estate, Redmond Real Estate, Windermere, Home Buying in Seattle

Image Source: Canva

 

Thanks to COVID-19, the new reality is that many open houses and home tours are being conducted virtually. For prospective home buyers, this new territory brings an added element to prepare for in the home buying process. Some of the questions that should be asked in a virtual home tour parallel those of in-person tours, but others are unique to today’s virtual world.

 

Could you zoom in?

  • Sometimes it can be difficult to get a true glimpse at what you want to see in a room. Asking the agent to zoom in on specific features is commonplace in virtual home tours, and they understand this is part of the viewer experience. Don’t hesitate to ask multiple times. Getting a better look at everything you want to see will help you feel like you’ve gotten the most out of your virtual tour.

 

How many square feet are in this room?

  • Virtual tours can slightly distort space, making it tough to gauge the size. The room-to-room square footage is information the agent is sure to have handy. Since you can’t be there in person, it will help you piece together the virtual visuals with the sense of physical space that we’re all accustomed to feeling in the places we live.

 

What color is that?

  • In the smartphone era, and computer era at large, we have come to understand that digital representations of color are not always true to the eye. Ask the agent to confirm specific colors so you can plan accordingly. Have a color swatch on hand or look the colors up online as you go through the tour.

 

When were the appliances last updated?

  • The importance of this question rings true in past, present, and future. Knowing the state of the home’s appliances, and the likelihood and timing of when they will need replacement, is vital information for both assessing the move-in readiness of the home and understanding what costs might lie ahead.

 

Has the seller provided an inspection?

  • This is another example of a critical question, whether your home tour is virtual or physical. If the seller has already done an inspection, ask the agent to lead you to any areas of concern based on the inspector’s findings. If there is anything that has not yet been addressed by the seller, have your agent ask what their plan is for making the necessary repairs/updates.

 

When is the offer review date?

  • Understanding the seller’s timeline for reviewing and accepting offers will help guide your decision-making process and allow you to strategize based on the timeline.

 

Whether your home tour is physical or virtual, getting the information you need to make an informed decision remains paramount. Although there is no substitute for physically being in the home you are looking to buy, keeping these questions in mind will position you well as you progress through the home buying journey.

Posted on May 26, 2020 at 10:16 pm
Annie Hyatt | Category: Buyers in Seattle, Buying a house, Buying Houses, Seattle Area Homes, Seattle Eastside, Selling Houses | Tagged , , ,

Use Your Whole House

We bought our house almost 14 years ago because I liked the neighborhood and the yard.  My husband actually wanted other homes with smaller yards, but I convinced him this was the one for us because of the fact it was a lot cheaper than the others due to the dated look, and we could remodel it with our own style. Yay, he agreed!  (He still complains about the yard, though.)

 

We immediately did an extensive remodel that added about 300 sf, took out walls, and added an upstairs porch.  We repainted over the years, switched out furniture, and other small projects, but we realized we didn’t use the main family room barely at all.  Originally, when we took out a wall between the kitchen and the family room, we thought we’d have that open concept everyone loved; except the family room was narrow and had doorways and fireplaces that screwed up the furniture placement. It wasn’t a comfy place to hang out until one day I realized I was running in and out of the living room where the tv is to watch a football game while cooking.

“Hot hubby, I would really like a tv in the family room so I can cook and watch football.”  Hot hubby’s face lit up, he likes a project.

“Well, we can do that, but I think there needs to be a focal point above the fireplace with some planking and trim, and maybe some windows on each side to bring in light; oh, and some built-ins for storage; you know we’ll have to change the furniture for it to work…”

When he gets a project in his mind, I just say, “Ya, sounds great,” and let him at it.  Oh my word, it was the best idea ever.  Now this room is used constantly.  It is possibly the favorite room in the house, and the living room is also still used a lot as well when people want to watch different shows, use the larger couch, or play the piano.

“Why didn’t we do this ages ago?!”  I love that our entire house is actually being used all of the time now.

Family Room

What can you do to a room that is never used? Can you change its function? Do you really use that formal dining room or do you need a den?  The fancy living room far from the kitchen: do you ever sit in it other than at holidays? Could you turn the bonus room into a gym now that the kids are older? (We did.)

If you aren’t using your whole house, maybe it is just too big… SEGUE…and that is where I come in!  How smooth was that? 😁

Posted on January 29, 2019 at 7:33 pm
Annie Hyatt | Category: Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , ,